The Design: The Anzac Memorial Centenary Project

The Anzac Memorial in Sydney’s Hyde Park was originally built to honour the servicemen and women who lost their lives in the Great War. Today, it is NSW’s principal memorial to all Australians who have served. To commemorate the Centenary of Anzac, the Anzac Memorial Trustees have a vision to promote and enhance the Memorial by providing a place to educate future generations about the Anzac spirit.

The Project has been designed by distinguished architecture practice Johnson Pilton Walker, in collaboration with the NSW Government Architect’s Office.

The Centenary Project’s design draws from the existing Memorial spaces. A new forecourt at Hyde Park’s Liverpool Street entrance will allow for equitable access to both the park, as envisaged by Dellit, and new underground education and interpretation facilities.

Memorial visitors will enter the new ‘Hall of Service’ via a walkway through a symbolic water cascade.  The Hall will function as a greeting and orientation space for the public, including tour groups and school children; and as a venue for ceremonies and functions, flowing onto exhibition galleries and education facilities. On the northern edge of the Hall of Service, opposite the walkway, a set of stairs and travellators will take visitors up to the ground floor of the Anzac Memorial and the Hall of Silence, where the sculpture Sacrifice stands. 

An oculus, an architectural reference to the Well of Contemplation in the existing Hall of Memory, will be centred above the Hall of Service with a view out to the Memorial exterior. 

These new spaces will be finished with high-quality materials: contemporary equivalents of the noble and honest materials used for the original building.

The refurbishment of the existing Memorial ground floor and basement areas will restore original layouts where possible in respect for the significant heritage of the Memorial.

 

On this day
22 October

1916 — HMAS UNA (ex German sloop KOMET) arrived at Malekula Island, New Hebrides, to mount a punitive action against rebellious natives. 40% of UNA’s crew were struck down with malaria

1942 — Battle of GOODENOUGH ISLAND, New Guinea.  This island was occupied by the Sasebo 5th SNLF (Japanese) and securing it was part of the build-up for a major offensive at BUNA

1950 — Battle of YONGJU / The Apple Orchard. This was the first action that Australian troops saw in Korea when they were called to support American troops. Capt Denness won a Military Cross, Lt Butler won a Silver Star and 7 Australians were wounded in the action