Telegram from Colonel Luscombe to Alfred Harris, 2 September 1915.

Historical note

The Battle of Lone Pine (6 August 1915) holds a very special place in NSW military history. Like so much of the Gallipoli campaign, the cost was high. Of the 2,277 Australians killed, missing or badly wounded at Lone Pine, 1,655 volunteers had enlisted in NSW.

On 2 September 1915 Alfred Harris received a telegram from Colonel Luscombe, Assistant Adjutant General of the 2nd Military District, informing him that his son had been reported missing since 14 August.

A few days later the newspapers printed a casualty list that listed Jack Harris among the wounded.

Over the coming weeks the Harrises wrote to Victoria Barracks in Sydney and to the battalion on active service with the MEF. Desperate for any information, they contacted a friend in London, Mrs EM Starkey, asking her to search British hospitals as many of the Gallipoli wounded were being sent there.

In early October they read an article in the Sydney Morning Herald describing the death of their son’s commander and mentor, the Revd Dr La Touche.

Materials
papers
Category
Diaries and personal papers
Themes
Personal story
Conflict
First World War
Location
Victoria Barracks
Story
Jack Harris
Production Date
2 September 1915

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