Private Charles Henry Woodlock Memorial Plaque

Historical note: 

This death plaque was sent to Tilly Odell (nee Woodlock), the younger sister of Private Charles Henry Woodlock of the 18th Battalion AIF who was missing, presumed killed, on Hill 60.

Hill 60 had been ignored for most of the Gallipol campaign but when the British established a beachhead at Suvla Bay, the Hill was needed to create a link with Anzac Cove.

The Australians and New Zealanders launched attacks on 21 and 27 August. The 2nd Australian Division, including the 18th Battalion from NSW, used darkness to get into position and were led to their jumping-off point by New Zealand Major Charles Powles. 

The 18th had only two months experience in the AIF. They were caught by machine gun fire when they advanced up the hill. Of the 3,985 British and Empire troops sent against the Turkish position on Hill 60, 1,302 were killed, wounded or missing.

The Red Cross inquiry into the disappearance of Charles Woodlock heard that 'Bluey' Woodlock of C Company was seen starting off with his bombing party at Hill 60. None of the members of that party returned. Corporal Uren of C Company had told the informant that they had been blown up in a sap.

Materials: 
Bronze
Category: 
Awards and decorations
Themes: 
Love and loss
Conflict: 
First World War
Location: 
Hill 60
Story: 
Tilly Odell and Charles Henry Woodlock
Production Date: 
August 1915
Engraved: 
He died for freedom and honour - Charles Henry Woodlock

On this day

On this day
17 January

1917 — 4 Squadron, Australian Flying Corps, sailed for France. This was the last AFC Squadron formed in WW1 and began active service over the Western Front in the Battle of Cambrai

1945 — Battle of TSIMBA RIDGE, a strongly fortified Japanese position  in the north of Bougainville

1991 — Coalition air attacks began against Iraqi forces in IRAQ and KUWAIT, marking the beginning of the GULF WAR, which ended when Iraqi forces were driven from Kuwait