The Hall of Service

The Hall of Service, at the centre of the Centenary Extension, is a civic space that architecturally and artistically mirrors the Hall of Silence. The Hall was named in acknowledgement of the original Memorial halls and to recognise more than a century of service by Australian servicemen and servicewomen.  At the threshold to the space are the words: “NSW Service with and for All Australians”.

The Hall also draws from the spatial qualities and is envisioned as a contemporary interpretation of the original halls to extend the Memorial visitor experience into the new facility. Visitors are able to see into the Hall of Memory via sightlines through the grand stairwell and the Oculus.

The architectural form and symbollic purpose of the space is reinforced and given powerful meaning by Fiona Hall's artwork. The partnership between Ms Hall and Centenary Extension architect, Richard Johnson honours the original partnership between artist Rayner Hoff and architect Bruce Dellit.  

The Hall of Service functions as a greeting and orientation space for the public, including tour groups and school children; and as a venue for ceremonies and functions, flowing onto exhibition galleries and education facilities.

 

On this day

On this day
16 February

1942— BANKA ISLAND MASSACRE. Following the sinking of the SS Vyner Brook, many of the survivors, including 22 Australian nurses, reached the shore of Banka Island. Realising that their position was desperate, an officer from the ship set out with most of the women and children to surrender the group to the Japanese. The officer returned with 20 Japanese soldiers who ordered all the men capable of walking to move to hidden part of the beach and killed them. They then returned to the beach and ordered the 22 nurses and 1 British civilian woman to walk into the water. They were machine-gunned in the back. All the immobile survivors were then killed. Sister Vivian Bullwinkle pretended to be dead and was the only survivor